Thursday, September 29, 2022

How Can I Find All Of My 401k Accounts

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Roll It Over Into Your New Employer’s Plan

How to find an old 401k

You’ll have to double check with your new employer to make sure they accept rollovers from a previous job. But if you get the go ahead to do this, you’d be able to just manage one 401 account rather than two different accounts potentially from two different plan providers .

“Some people find that having just one 401 account makes it easier to see all their money in one place,” MacDonald explained.

The money will still have the chance to grow in your new employer’s plan just make sure you like the new investment options available to you. And you’ll be able to save on all the additional costs that come with just keeping your balance with your old employer.

And unlike with the IRA rollover option, you won’t have to take required minimum distributions at age 72 if you move the money into your new employer’s 401 plan.

“Ultimately, it comes down to convenience,” MacDonald said. “And if you like seeing all of your assets in one place then this option could make sense.”

If You Find The Money

What to do with your 401 funds when you find the account largely depends on where you find it.

If the account resides in your employer’s plan, you do have the option to leave the money and the account there — just note you can no longer contribute money to it.

To get back in the game with your sidelined 401, roll it over into an individual retirement account or a current employer’s 401 plan. That way you can put the fund money to work by investing in stocks, bonds and funds that appreciate in value and accumulate more money for your retirement, on a tax-efficient basis.

Contact Your Old Employer About Your Old 401

Employers will try to track down a departed employee who left money behind in an old 401, but their efforts are only as good as the information they have on file. Beyond providing 30 to 60 days notice of their intentions, there are no laws that say how hard they have to look or for how long.

If its been a while since youve heard from your former company, or if youve moved or misplaced the notices they sent, start by contacting your former companys human resources department or find an old 401 account statement and contact the plan administrator, the financial firm that held the account and sent you updates.

You may be allowed to leave your money in your old plan, but you might not want to.

If there was more than $5,000 in your retirement account when you left, theres a good chance that your money is still in your workplace account. You may be allowed to leave it there for as long as you like until youre age 72, when the IRS requires you to start taking distributions, but you might not want to. Heres how to decide whether to keep your money in an old 401.

The good news if a new IRA was opened for the rollover: Your money retains its tax-protected status. The bad: You have to find the new trustee.

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How Does Money Get Left Behind

Very few people stay at one employer the entire length of their career.

But unlike your bank account which you may have from job to job, a 401 account is linked to your employer. It is up to you to do something about it.

When you leave your employer, the money may stay in the account for an indefinite amount of time.

However, if the company closes the 401 plan, files for bankruptcy, goes out of business or is acquired by another company, you may be forced to decide, within a short period of time.

Its possible that years will go by after you parted ways with your old job, and then youll get a letter notifying you that you need to move your 401 account, or take a distribution.

If this happens, youre much better off rolling the money into an IRA account, or transferring the money into your current companys 401 plan.

How The Rollover Is Done Is Important Too

How Can I Find Out My 401k Balance?

Whether you pick an IRA for your rollover or choose to go with your new employer’s plan, consider a direct rolloverthats when one financial institution sends a check directly to the other financial institution. The check would be made out to the bank or brokerage firm with instructions to roll the money into your IRA or 401.

The alternative, having a check made payable to you, is not a good option in this case. If the check is made payable directly to you, your employer is required by the IRS to withhold 20% for taxes. As if that wouldn’t be bad enoughyou only have 60 days from the time of a withdrawal to put the money back into a tax-advantaged account like a 401 or IRA. That means if you want the full value of your former account to stay in the tax-advantaged confines of a retirement account, you’d have to come up with the 20% that was withheld and put it into your new account.

If you’re not able to make up the 20%, not only will you lose the potential tax-free or tax-deferred growth on that money but you may also owe a 10% penalty if you’re under age 59½ because the IRS would consider the tax withholding an early withdrawal from your account. So, to make a long story short, do pay attention to the details when rolling over your 401.

Also Check: Can You Roll Over 401k From One Company To Another

K Search Find And Claim Missing 401 Retirement Plan Benefits

The U.S. Department of Labor estimates each year 2.8 million workers fail to claim or rollover $155 billion in 401k retirement plan assets when they change jobs. In total, 24 million participants are owed unclaimed funds totaling $1.33 trillion. A disproportionate share of the missing are family members of deceased employees who fail to claim pension benefits stemming from employment that may have ended years earlier.

Another increasingly common problem: former employees of bankrupt companies unable to locate their 401 accounts, because many insolvent businesses fail to provide for the administration of 401k plan assets when they cease operations. Participants in defined-contribution retirement plans such as the 401 are protected when their employers fail or otherwise cease operations, because they individually own the assets in their accounts.

This differs from employees with traditional pension plans, which are subject to the solvency of the employer but may be protected against loss by the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, the federal agency responsible for the regulation of private pension plans.

Note: For assistance with a missing defined-benefit pension, go to: Unclaimed Pension Search. For assistance with a lost IRA, go to: Unclaimed IRA Search.

If you have reason to believe you are entitled to claim a missing 401k, either as the employee, spouse or rightful heir, but have not received payment, complete the form below to initiate a search.

What You Can Do Next

In order to keep track of your retirement accounts, you first must know where they all are. Once you gather all your old accounts in one place and make sure they are properly balanced, its about sticking to the same investment principles ensuring your money is in diversified, low-cost funds that you would follow for your current company retirement plan.

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Move Your Retirement Savings Directly Into Your Current Or New Qrp If The Qrp Allows

If you are at a new company, moving your retirement savings to this employers QRP may be an option. This option may be appropriate if youd like to keep your retirement savings in one account, and if youre satisfied with investment choices offered by this plan. This alternative shares many of the same features and considerations of leaving your money with your former employer.

Features

  • Option not available to everyone .
  • Waiting period for enrolling in new employers plan may apply.
  • New employers plan will determine:
  • When and how you access your retirement savings.
  • Which investment options are available to you.
  • You can transfer or roll over only plan assets that your new employer permits.
  • Favorable tax treatment of appreciated employer securities is lost if moved into another QRP.
  • Note: If you choose this option, make sure your new employer will accept a transfer from your old plan, and then contact the new plan provider to get the process started. Also, remember to periodically review your investments, and carefully track associated paperwork and documents. There may be no RMDs from your QRP where you are currently employed, as long as the plan allows and you are not a 5% or more owner of that company.

    Find Your Retirement Accounts

    How Can I Get My Money Out Of A 401k?

    In order to corral all your accounts, you first must locate all your retirement plans.

    If you know you had a plan with certain employers but dont know how to access it, reach out to your former company. They should provide you with the information you need to access the account.

    What happens if the company is no longer in business? Well, your retirement account should still be held somewhere. Its your money, after all. You can go to the Abandoned Plan database Opens in new window, hosted by the Department of Labor. There you can search the company, and you will be provided with information on how to locate the lost plan.

    You can also search the National Registry of Unclaimed Retirement Benefits Opens in new window to find plans under your name.

    Once you find one account, you can potentially spot a few more, as theres a possibility you have multiple plans hosted by the same company. The other accounts should come up as you log into the management companys website.

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    Option : Move The Money To An Ira

    If you’re not able to transfer the funds to your current 401 or you don’t want to, you can roll over the funds to an IRA instead. The process is the same as doing a rollover to a new 401, and you still have the choice between a direct or indirect rollover.

    You’ll need to set up a new IRA with any broker if you don’t already have one. Make sure you choose an IRA that’s taxed the same way as your old 401 funds. Most 401s are tax-deferred, which means your contributions reduce your taxable income in the year you make them, but you pay taxes on your withdrawals in retirement. You want a traditional IRA in this case because the government taxes these funds the same way.

    If you had a Roth 401, you want a Roth IRA. Both of these accounts give you tax-free withdrawals in retirement if you pay taxes on your contributions the year you make them.

    In most cases, losing track of your old 401 doesn’t mean the money is gone for good. But finding it is only half the challenge. You must also decide where to keep those funds going forward so they’ll be most useful to you. Think the decision through carefully, then follow the steps above.

    Search Unclaimed Assets Databases

    If your search is still coming up empty, your former employer has folded or was bought by another company, youâre not out of luck yet.

    It may take a little more effort and research but there are many national databases that can help you track down your old 401 accounts:

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    How To Find An Old 401 And What To Do With It

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    There are billions of dollars sitting unclaimed in ghosted workplace retirement plans. And some of it might be yours if youve ever left a job and forgotten to take your vested retirement savings with you.

    But no matter how long the cobwebs have been forming on your old 401, that money is still yours. All you have to do is find it.

    How To Find An Old : 7 Ways

    Can I Cash Out My Old 401(k) And Take The Money?

    People prone to leaving things behind usually don’t lose a 401 account, but it happens more often than you think – especially if you don’t have a great deal of cash stashed away in a 401.

    Data from Plan Sponsor Council of America shows that 58% of 401 transfer balances are between $1,000 and $5,000 when a career professional leaves an employer. That’s not an insignificant range of money, but it’s money you could have working for you, if you could only find it.

    Additionally, the U.S. Government Accountability Office states that over 25 million Americans with cash in a 401 or other employer retirement plan left that money behind when they moved on to greener career pastures.

    People leave old 401 accounts behind for many reasons. The account holder may have engaged in a string of job-hopping experiences and lost an old retirement account in the shuffle. Or, the 401 account holder’s company merged with another firm, was bought out, or went bankrupt.

    You might even automatically have been enrolled in an old 401 company by a firm you only spent a year or so working at, didn’t realize it, and completely missed bringing the 401 account along with you to your next job.

    If that sounds vaguely familiar, how do you find the money you lost in an old 401 account and what do you do with it when you get it back?

    There are plenty of ways to get the job done. Let’s take a closer look.

    Also Check: How To Roll Your 401k From Previous Employer

    When Not To Transfer To An Ira

    You now know some of the benefits of moving your 401 to an IRA. But control over your money isnt the only thing that matters, and you may have other priorities. Its impossible to list every potential pitfall, but a few examples may offer food for thought.

    Between age 55 and 59.5

    When youre at least 55 years oldbut not yet 59 1/2 years oldyou might want to leave at least some of your money in the 401 plan. 401s allow you to pull money out without penalty after age 55 . IRAs, on the other hand, require that you wait until age 59 ½ to avoid an early-withdrawal penalty of 10% on certain distributions. There are always exceptions and workarounds, but those are the basic rules. If you intend to spend your 401 savings between the ages of 55 and 59 1/2, keep this in mind before making a transfer.

    Note: Some public safety workers can avoid early withdrawal penalties from a retirement plan as early as age 50. If you worked for a federal, state, or local government, be sure to explore your options.

    Depending on state laws, money in IRAs might be treated differently, and a 401 might offer more protection . Federal law often applies to ERISA-covered 401 plans, while state laws cover IRAs. However, there is some federal protection for IRAs in bankruptcy. When you owe federal tax debts or assets are due to an ex-spouse, protection is usually limited.

    Roth Conversions

    RMD While Working

    Stable Value Offerings

    Fees and Expenses

    Withdrawing From Your 401 Before Age 55

    You have two options if you’re younger than age 55, and if you still work for the company that manages your 401 plan. This assumes that these options are made available by your employer. You can take a 401 loan if you need access to the money, or you can take a hardship withdrawal. but only from a current 401 account held by your employer. You can’t loans out on older 401 accounts. You can roll the funds over to an IRA or another employer’s 401 plan if you’re no longer employed by the company. But these plans must accept these types of rollovers.

    Think twice about cashing out. You’ll lose valuable creditor protection that stays in place when you keep the funds in your 401 plan at work. You could also be subject to a tax penalty, depending on why you’re taking the money.

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    Transferring Your 401 To Your Bank Account

    You can also skip the IRA and just transfer your 401 savings to a bank account. For example, you might prefer to move funds directly to a checking or savings account with your bank or credit union. Thats typically an option when you stop working, but be aware that moving money to your checking or savings account may be considered a taxable distribution. As a result, you could owe income taxes, additional penalty taxes, and other complications could arise.

    IRA first? If you need to spend all of the money soon, transferring from your 401 to a bank account could make sense. But theres another option: Move the funds to an IRA, and then transfer only what you need to your bank account. The transfer to an IRA is generally not a taxable event, and banks often offer IRAs, although the investment options may be limited. If you only need to spend a portion of your savings, you can leave the rest of your retirement money in the IRA, and you only pay taxes on the amount you distribute .

    Again, moving funds directly to a checking or savings account typically means you pay 20% mandatory tax withholding. That might be more than you need or want. Most IRAs, even if theyre not at your bank, allow you to establish an electronic link and transfer funds to your bank easily.

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