Thursday, June 16, 2022

What Is The Tax Penalty For Early 401k Withdrawal

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401k Early Withdrawal, are there tax penalties?

      The Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement Act of 2019, better known as the SECURE Act, which originally passed the House in July 2019, was approved by the Senate on Dec.19, 2019, as part of an end-of-year appropriations act and accompanying tax measure, and signed into law on Dec. 20, 2019, by President Donald Trump. The far-reaching bill includes significant provisions aimed at increasing access to tax-advantaged accounts and preventing older Americans from outliving their assets.

      How To Avoid The Early Withdrawal Penalty

      There are a few exceptions to the age 59½ minimum. The IRS offers penalty-free withdrawals under special circumstances related to death, disability, medical expenses, child support, spousal support and military active duty, says Bryan Stiger, CFP, a financial advisor at Betterments 401.

      If you dont meet any of those qualifications, you arent entirely out of luck, though. Youve got a couple of options that may let you make penalty-free withdrawals, if youre slightly younger than retirement age or plan your withdrawals methodically.

      If youre between age 55 and 59 ½ and you lose your job, the IRS will allow you to withdraw from your 401 plan penalty-free. This is called the Rule of 55, and it applies to everyone within this age group who loses a job, no matter whether youre fired, laid off or voluntarily quit. Stiger says. To qualify for the Rule of 55, the 401 you hope to take withdrawals from must be at the company youve just parted ways with. Note that the Rule of 55 does not apply to IRAs.

      There is also the Substantially Equal Periodic Payment exemption, or an IRS Section 72 distribution, say Stiger. With SEPP you can take substantially equal payments from your 401 based on life expectancy. Unlike the Rule of 55, you may use SEPPs to tap an IRA early.

      High Unreimbursed Medical Expenses

      This particular exception is similar to the hardship distributions mentioned earlier, and these medical bills might qualify you under either category. You should know that a hardship withdrawal for medical bills will not entitle you to a waiver of the 10% penalty in all cases. To qualify for a penalty-free withdrawal, the amount of the bills must be greater than 7.5% of your adjusted gross income . You must also take the distribution in the same year in which the bills were incurred. You cannot take money for estimated future bills either. The bills must be currently due for services already provided.

      Also note the requirement that the bills be unreimbursed. If your insurance covers part of the bills or will reimburse you for the payments, then you cannot use money from your 401 to pay them. Likewise, the bills must be for you, your spouse, or a qualified dependent. You cannot use the money to pay bills for a parent, sibling, or any other family member. The limit to the amount of money you can withdraw for medical bills was recently removed, so you are allowed to withdraw as much as is needed to cover all the expenses.

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      No : Roth Ira Qualified Education Expense Withdrawals

      Last but not least, you can pull money from your Roth IRA to pay for qualified education expenses for yourself or your dependents. As I stated in method No. 9, you can always pull your contributions out. However, in this case, you can also pull your earnings out early and penalty-free if you follow the rules.

      If youre blessed enough to be able to retire early, thats fantastic! But make sure you let your pre-planning work for you. You obviously want to have enough income to last throughout your retirement, but you also need protection from events as they happen in your life. Whether you need to cover unexpected medical bills or send your children to college without racking up mountains of student debt, know your options.

      While you cant avoid paying ordinary income taxes on early retirement account withdrawals, there may be ways you could avoid paying the 10% penalty. Speak to your financial adviser to determine if any of these methods are right for your unique situation.

      Tests For A 401 Hardship Withdrawal

      401k Early Withdrawal: What to Know Before You Cash Out ...

      The six tests for a hardship withdrawal did not change with the new law. Hardship withdrawals are permissible due to a heavy financial due to the following:

    • Medical care or medical costs
    • Purchase of a principal residence
    • Post-secondary education
    • Preventing the foreclosure of a principal residence or eviction
    • Funeral or burial expense
    • Repairs to a principal residence due to a casualty loss that would have been tax-deductible under Section 165 of the Internal Revenue Code
    • For 2020, there is an additional reason under the CARES Act: being negatively affected by COVID-19.

      From 2018 to 2025, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act declared such losses are not tax-deductible except in specified federal disaster areas. It should be noted that the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act also reduced the threshold for individuals deducting for medical expenses to those that exceed 7.5% of adjusted gross income for 2017 and 2018. However, that threshold rose back to 10% of AGI, starting in the 2019 tax year.

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      What To Ask Yourself Before Making A Withdrawal From Your Retirement Account

      There are many valid reasons for dipping into your retirement savings early. However, try to avoid the mindset that your retirement money is accessible. Retirement may feel like an intangible future event, but hopefully, it will be your reality some day. So before you take any money out, ask yourself: Do you actually need the money now?

      Think of it this way: Rather than putting money away, you are actually paying it forward. If you are relatively early on in your career, your present self may be unattached and flexible. But your future self may be none of those things. Pay it forward. Do not allow lifestyle inflation to put your future self in a bind.

      With all this talk of 10% penalties, and not touching the money until youre retired, we should point out that there is a solution if you feel the need to be able to access your retirement funds before you reach age 59 ½ without penalty.

      Contribute to a Roth IRA, if you qualify for one.

      Because contributions to Roth accounts are after tax, you are typically able to withdraw from one with fewer consequences. Keep in mind that there are income limits on contributing to Roth IRAs, and that you will still be taxed if you withdraw the funds early or before the account has aged five years, but some people find the ease of access comforting.

      For some folks, however, a Roth-type account is not easily available or accessible to them.

      Medical Expenses Or Insurance

      If you incur unreimbursed medical expenses that are greater than 10% of your adjusted gross income in that year, you are able to pay for them out of an IRA without incurring a penalty.

      For a 401k withdrawal, if your unreimbursed medical expenses exceed 7.5% of your adjusted gross income for the year then the penalty will likely be waived.

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      Cares Act Stimulus 401 Withdrawal Changes

      President Trump signed the CARES Act into law in March 2020. It’s a $2 trillion economic stimulus package intended to soften the health and economic impacts of COVID-19. The act included several provisions that allowed for more flexible use of retirement plans such as 401 plans to help cover emergency expenses, but some of them have since expired.

      How Much Tax Do I Pay On An Early 401 Withdrawal

      401K Early Withdrawal Penalty

      The money will be taxed as regular income. That’s between 10% and 37% depending on your total taxable income.

      In most cases, that money will be due for the tax year in which you take the distribution.

      The exception is for withdrawals taken for expenses related to the coronavirus pandemic. In response to the coronavirus pandemic, account owners have been given three years to pay the taxes they owe on distributions taken for economic hardships related to COVID-19.

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      How Long Will It Take To Get The Money You Withdrew From Your Accounts

      Regardless of how much you can access, you should know that withdrawing money from a retirement account is not as simple as transferring money from a savings to a checking account. The process could take several weeks. If you need the money for something time-sensitive, give yourself at least a two-week buffer in case paperwork gets delayed or is lost. Many companies are struggling to provide customer support via phone or online, and their ability to handle transactions may be limited as well. Talk to your plan provider or administrator about the steps and ask for an estimated timeline.

      Alternatives To Rule Of 55 Withdrawals

      The rule of 55, which doesnt apply to traditional or Roth IRAs, isnt the only way to get money from your retirement plan early. For example, you wont pay the penalty if you take distributions early because:

      • You become totally and permanently disabled.
      • You pass away and your beneficiary or estate is withdrawing money from the plan.
      • Youre taking distributions to pay deductible medical expenses that exceed 7.5% of your adjusted gross income.
      • Distributions are the result of an IRS levy.
      • Youre receiving qualified reservist distributions.

      You can also avoid the 10% early withdrawal penalty if early distributions are made as part of a series of substantially equal periodic payments, known as a SEPP plan. You have to be separated from service to qualify for this exception if youre taking money from an employers plan, but youre not subject to the 55 or older requirement. The payment amounts youd receive come from your life expectancy.

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      Avoid The 401 Early Withdrawal Penalty

      While the age for avoiding the penalty is normally 59 1/2, there is an exception to the age rule. If you leave a job or are terminated at age 55 or later, then you can make withdrawals from your account with that employer without paying the penalty. Make sure that you do not make withdrawals from any other plans you might have as those will still be subject to the penalty.

      Likewise, remember that there are even heavier penalties for missing required minimum distributions . Upon reaching age 72, you are required to withdraw certain amounts from your account. If you fail to make the withdrawal, then you will receive a penalty of 50% of the amount of the required distribution. Suppose you were required to withdraw $8,000 from your 401. If you miss that distribution, then you will owe $4,000 in the penalty alone!

      How To Take Money Out Of Your 401

      How Much Tax For Withdrawal Of 401k

      There are many different ways to take money out of a 401, including:

      • Withdrawing money when you retire: These are withdrawals made after age 59 1/2.
      • Making an early withdrawal: These are withdrawals made prior to age 59 1/2. You may be subject to a 10% penalty unless your situation qualifies as an exception.
      • Making a hardship withdrawal: These are early withdrawals made because of immediate financial need. You may be still be penalized for them.
      • Taking out a 401 loan: You can borrow against your 401 and will not incur penalties as long as you repay the loan on schedule.
      • Rolling over a 401: If you leave your job, you can move your 401 into another 401 or IRA without penalty as long as the funds are moved over within 60 days of your distribution.

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      Will The Full Balance Be Available To You

      If you are withdrawing from an employer-based account and are relatively new to your job and are not considered fully-vested for retirement purposes, the portion of the funds that were contributed by your employer may not be available to you. Even if you are fully vested, your employer may not allow you to access that portion of your account. Remember, the special tax treatment does not apply to more than $100,000 total.

      Living With A Disability

      If you become totally and permanently disabled, getting access to your retirement account early becomes easier. In this case, the government allows you to withdraw funds before age 59½ without penalty. Be prepared to prove that youre truly unable to work. Disability payments from either Social Security or an insurance carrier usually suffice, though a doctor’s confirmation of your disability is frequently required.

      Keep in mind that if you are permanently disabled, you may need your 401 even more than most investors. Therefore, tapping your account should be a last resort, even if you lose the ability to work.

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      Ira Rollover Bridge Loan

      There is one final way to borrow from your 401k or IRA on a short-term basis. You can roll it over into a different IRA. You are allowed to do this once in a 12-month period. When you roll an account over, the money is not due into the new retirement account for 60 days. During that period, you can do whatever you want with the cash. However, if its not safely deposited in an IRA when time is up, the IRS will consider it an early distribution. You will be subject to penalties in the full amount. This is a risky move and is not generally recommended. However, if you want an interest-free bridge loan and are sure you can pay it back, its an option.

      Home Equity Loan Or Home Equity Line Of Credit

      401k Early Withdrawal Exceptions | NO PENALTY

      A home equity loan or home equity line of credit could be a smarter way to get cash for your large purchase.

      Common sense financial planning would generally not endorse taking on new debt, but it may be better in the long run than withdrawing money from a 401k plan.

      Thats because over time, the returns on the stock market are usually higher than the interest rates on home equity loans.

      As long as you are in position to pay back loans and get a favorable interest rate, its better to consider borrowing from a bank than from your future self in the form of a 401k withdrawal or loan.

      HELs and HELOCs are loans that use your home equity for collateral. Because theyre secured by your house, they tend to have low interest rates.

      Currently, home equity lines of credit come with variable interest rates of about 5 percent, and the fixed rates for home equity loans are slightly higher. Both are lower than stock market returns in a typical year.

      When you factor in the 10 percent tax penalty and the potential loss of capital gains incurred by withdrawing from a 401k, many people would be better off getting a home equity line of credit or loan.

      Keep in mind, however, that interest rates have been on the rise and market returns have been volatile. So there is some risk to using a HELOC for your purchase.

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      How Early Retirement Plan Withdrawals Work Under Normal Circumstances

      When there isnt a global pandemic impacting the livelihoods of the entire nation, withdrawing money early from a retirement plan is a serious decision. Thats because it carries with it some pretty serious consequences: namely, a 10% penalty paid on all of the money you withdraw, in addition to paying normal taxes. This, of course, assumes it is not a Roth plan, where the money has already been taxed.

      Even if youre willing to pay the penalty, you have get approval from your plan beforehand. This is typically known as a hardship withdrawal. Some plan sponsors may not be willing to grant them, so make sure you check with your HR department before you plan on making one. Acceptable reasons for a hardship withdrawal include:

      • Paying certain medical bills for you or family members
      • Avoiding foreclosure on or to buy a primary residence
      • Covering educational expenses for you or family members
      • Paying for family funeral expenses
      • Paying for some home repairs, such as those necessary after a natural disaster

      Note that these reasons still carry the 10% penalties, in addition to taxes. There are a few instances where the penalty is waived:

      Whats The Difference Between A Withdrawal And A 401 Loan

      With a 401 loan, you must repay the money back into your account over a period of time. With a standard withdrawal, there are no repayment requirements. You will be charged interest on the loan, although you are technically paying the interest back to yourself. The money goes back into your 401 account, and you usually can spread the payments out up to 5 years. If you are using the money for a down payment on a home, you can even spread them over 15 years. A loan is usually a much better option than a withdrawal because at least you will be replacing the money. However, not all plans offer 401 loans, so that might not be an option for you.

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      Considering An Early Retirement Withdrawal Cares Act Rules And What You Should Know

      This blog was originally posted on May 27, 2020 and was updated on June 30, 2020.

      If youre out of work and need income, you might be considering withdrawing from your retirement savings. Normally, if you withdraw money from traditional Individual Retirement Accounts and employer-provided accounts before reaching age 59 ½, you have to pay a 10 percent early withdrawal penalty.

      Furthermore, emergency withdrawals from your current employer-provided plans are limited to an amount needed to meet a limited set of approved hardships, like avoiding foreclosure, home repairs after a disaster, or medical expenses.

      If the pandemic has had negative effects on your finances, temporary changes to the rules under the CARES Act may give you more flexibility to make an emergency withdrawal from tax-deferred retirement accounts during 2020.

      Among other things, the CARES Act eliminates the 10 percent early withdrawal penalty if you are under the age of 59 ½. One third of the money you withdraw will be included as income in your taxes for each of the next three years unless you elect otherwise. The CARES Act also allows you to pay back what you withdrew from your accounts if youre able to do so.

      Please note that this blog discusses withdrawals from retirement plans not retirement plan loans. You may want to spend some time weighing the risks and benefits to withdrawing money versus taking a loan. Learn more about taking a loan from your retirement accounts.

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